Season 6 Archived Episodes (1997 - 1998)

Printz, Ravalli County, Montana Vs. United States (No. 601)

County Attorneys and Sheriffs join Gene Brodeur to examine the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that upheld Ravalli County Sheriff Jay Printz's challenge to part of the Brady gun law. The nation's highest court has ruled that local officials were not required to do background checks on gun buyers. At issue now in Montana is whether even voluntary checks are legal. (First Aired Friday, September 12, 1997)


What Did You Learn In School Today? (No. 602)

Gene Brodeur explores new approaches to language and math. A foreign language program for K through 5 children at Hawthorne School in Bozeman, is attracting statewide attention. And, high school girls from rural schools and Indian reservations are being encouraged to pursue careers in science and engineering. (First Aired Friday, September 26, 1997)


Road Rage (No. 603)

Road Rage. Who are these aggressive drivers and why are they behaving so badly? Gene Brodeur examines the dramatic increase in vehicular violence that prompted the AAA to offer this advice: "never underestimate the other driver's capacity for mayhem." (First Aired Friday, October 10, 1997)


Gambling: Money for Nothing Or High Stakes? (No. 604)

Whether you call it gambling or gaming, it's on a roll. Gene Brodeur explores the rapid growth industry that we spend more money on than we do on movies, theme parks, sports and cd's collectively. Is gaming a form of easy money for local and state government, or is the long time payoff bankruptcy? (First Aired Friday, October 24, 1997)


The Cutthroat Trout: A Victim of the Times? (No. 605)

Expansion and development pose a threat to the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers that Lewis and Clark explored in 1804. Gene Brodeur examines attempts to preserve these rivers and the impact that pollution has on the state fish and other fresh water species. (First Aired Friday, November 14, 1997)


Humanities In Montana (No. 606)

On this 25th anniversary of the Montana Committee for the Humanities, Gene Brodeur visits with some of the founders of the group that was established to provide local communities with cultural programs about their state. What's in the future? Websites, films, publications and more. (First Aired Friday, November 28, 1997)


The Season of Giving (No. 607)

This is the time of year when volunteer relief agencies are stressed to the limits. Many groups are finding that cutbacks at the state and federal level are putting extra pressure on volunteer groups to fill the gaps beyond the holiday season. Gene Brodeur examines the growing needs of the have nots. (First Aired Friday, December 12, 1997)


What's New In '97? (No. 608)

Editors from newspapers throughout Montana look back on editorials and responses from readers about the stories that captured the headlines in 1997. (First Aired Friday, December 26, 1997)


Roe V. Wade: 25 Years Later (No. 609)

Gene Brodeur looks back to the time when abortion was illegal in Montana, the impact that Roe v. Wade had on our state, and the fragile future of abortion in our state. (First Aired Friday, January 23, 1998)


Roe V. Wade: Another View (No. 610)

Pro Life advocates voice their opposition to abortion and defend their support of legislation such as parental notification to limit teen access to the procedure. (First Aired Friday, February 13, 1998)


El Nino and Montana (No. 611)

Gene Brodeur examines the effect on Montana of the phenomenon known as 'El Nino', with members of the Governor's Drought Committee. The same condition that triggered flooding on the west coast, has left Montana 'high and dry'. (First Aired Friday, February 27, 1998)


Native American Foster Care (No. 612)

Indian professionals and advocates for Indian children are concerned about their welfare in a climate of shrinking Federal budgets. Gene Brodeur examines the need for Native American foster care and the obstacles facing volunteers, tribal leaders, and government agencies who are dealing with this complex issue. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Television. (First Aired Friday, March 13, 1998)


Shrinking Borders (No. 613)

Yellowstone, the nation's oldest and largest national park, is facing a difficult future. Gene Brodeur updates the ongoing debate over extending the park's borders to provide a buffer zone for bison, wolves and other migrating animals which roam outside park boundaries onto privately owned land. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Television. (First Aired Friday, March 27, 1998)


Outrage: A Look at Abusive Behavior Against Women (No. 614)

It's a chilling statistic. Women comprise 95% of the victims of domestic violence. Gene Brodeur explores violent male behavior and the grave risks facing women in abusive relationships. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, April 10, 1998)


Old Friends (No. 615)

The good news is that we're living longer. But what happens when we reach the age that requires some looking after? Gene Brodeur looks at some innovative programs concerning rural aging, and the growing need for senior day care centers. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, April 24, 1998)


Binge Drinking: Right of Passage Or Serious Proble (No. 616)

44% of college students across the country admit to binge drinking every couple of weeks. Gene Brodeur examines the problem on Montana campuses and what's being done to encourage students to avoid heavy drinking. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, May 15, 1998)


Whole Person Teacher Education (No. 617)

Dr. Julie Mahoney explains her eight year project involving a "hands on, minds on" teaching model aimed at promoting creativity in students by using the outdoors as a classroom whenever possible. Maloney believes that her model will enable teachers to tap the vast potential of a child's capacity for learning and creativity. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, May 29, 1998)


The Purple Breast (No. 618)

Gene Brodeur examines a unique show about breast cancer that is touring Montana. Based on a true story about a playwright who loses her battle with breast cancer, the educational production is followed by a question and answer session between the audience and medical experts on cancer awareness. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, June 12, 1998)


Slowdown Dude! (No. 619)

Since Montana scrapped its numerical speed limit more than 2 years ago traffic fatalities have jumped 34.5%. Those figures are earning Montana the dubious distinction of having the highest number of highway fatalities in the nation. Gene Brodeur updates the ongoing debate over daytime speed limits as the state legislature prepares to deal with the issue in the next session. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, June 26, 1998)


Race and Multicultural Issues On Campus (No. 620)

Growth through diversity is the theme of this special Montana Profilesfollow up to President Clinton's Initiative On Race. Diversity training is just one of the goals of the newly established Multicultural Resource Center. Gene Brodeur examines this and efforts underway at the U of M and MSU aimed at dealing with discrimination. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, July 10, 1998)


Ursus Horribillus: Endangered and Dangerous (No. 621)

There was a time when park tourists could see grizzlies foraging at o pen garbage dumps. More recent encounters occur when hikers stumble upon a sow and her cubs on a trail. Gene Brodeur visits with writer Scott McMillion and bear specialists about encounters with grizzlies in a shrinking habitat. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, July 24, 1998)