Montana Profiles

Beginning in 1993, Gene Brodeur hosted a bi-weekly news public affairs series for MontanaPBS. The series concluded in 2003. 

2003


Libby: The Continuing Fallout (No. 1201)

It has been almost two years since Gov. Martz used Montana's one and only "silver bullet" superfund option for the cleanup of asbestos-contaminated soil in Libby's yards, school grounds and businesses. The deadly tremolite asbestos from the bankrupt W.R. Grace vermiculite mine has claimed the lives of former workers and members of their families and other residents of the town. Gene Brodeur brings us up to date on EPA cleanup efforts, and talks with Libby residents who are dealing with the often fatal and as yet untreatable side effects of asbestos poisoning. (First Aired Wednesday, September 17, 2003)


Education Upgrade (No. 1202)

A coalition of educators is urging Gov. Martz to spend some of a $50 million federal windfall on K-12 education. Gene Brodeur talks with educators and lawmakers to gauge the group's chances of getting $14 million set aside to ensure that certain fundamental programs won't be cut. (First Aired Thursday, October 09, 2003)


Deregulation: The Free Fall Continues (No. 1203)

Can things get much worse for troubled NorthWestern Corporation? The picture is not bright. The company filed for bankruptcy after its stock plummeted from $21 dollars a share to just 61 cents. Gene Brodeur visits with members of the Public Service Commission and the Montana Consumer Council about future delivery of energy to some 300, 000 NorthWestern Energy customers in Montana. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, October 23, 2003)


American Indian Issues In Montana (No. 1204)

Tribal members on Montana's seven Reservations are dealing with cultural preservation, water rights, and crowded classrooms. Gene Brodeur visits with leaders of the Indian community about accomplishments and challenges as the country celebrates Native American Heritage Month. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM - Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, November 06, 2003)


Medicaid: A Train Wreck Waiting to Happen? (No. 1205)

Nebraska Governor Mike Johanns told his colleagues at the Western Governors Conference in Big Sky that the medicaid train had already left the tracks. Health Care providers in Montana discuss the soaring cost of health care as more and more people turn to public assistance for medical services. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM - Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, November 13, 2003)

2002 & 2003


Special Legislative Session 2002 (No. 1101)

Legislative leaders look back at the two-week special session held in August that resulted in millions of dollars in spending cuts to keep the state's books balanced through June 30th of next year. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, September 19, 2002)


Ir-117: Roll Back Deregulation? (No. 1102)

Representative Chris Harris (D-Bozeman), who co-sponsored the initiative drive to roll back deregulation of electrical energy, and Senator Fred Thomas (R-Stevensville), who carried the deregulation measure HB-474, join Gene Brodeur for a discussion about the controversial measure. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, October 10, 2002)


I-145: The Buy Back The Dams Initiative (No. 1103)

I-145 calls for the creation of an elected public power commission to buy back the state's hydroelectric dams and operate them for the benefit of Montanans. Representative Roy Brown (R-Billings), a member of the opposition group "Dam Risky Business," and Senator Ken Toole (D-Helena), who proposed the "Buy Back the Dams" initiative, join Gene Brodeur for a discussion about I-145. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, October 24, 2002)


2002 Election: A Look Back (No. 1104)

Montanans decided who will represent them at the Congressional and State legislative levels, and voted on two initiatives aimed at dismantling deregulation. Leading journalists look back on the November 5th results. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, November 07, 2002)


Tax Reform: Will It Fly? (No. 1105)

An advisory council appointed by Governor Martz is recommending an income tax cut of more than $45 million next year. Gene Brodeur visits with members of the Governor's Income Tax Advisory Council about the proposal and its chances of passing muster during the 2003 Legislative Session. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, November 14, 2002)


Domestic Violence: An Issue of Survival (No. 1106)

Host Gene Brodeur spends an hour on the troubling issue of domestic violence, often referred to as "the silent crime." First, survivors of domestic violence will discuss their personal stories. Then prosecutors, counselors and coordinators for the Battered Women's Network will provide us with information about shelters and support networks that can assist victims in their recovery and provide them with hope. (First Aired Thursday, December 26, 2002)


Revving Up: Snowmobiles In Yellowstone (No. 1107)

The Bush administration has reversed a proposed Clinton ban on the use of snowmobiles in Yellowstone Park. Gene Brodeur talks with environmentalists and snowmobile enthusiasts about the compromise proposal scheduled to take effect in March. (First Aired Thursday, January 09, 2003)


First Response in a Post 9-11 World (No. 1108)

Emergency medical teams are among the first on the scene of natural and terrorist-caused catastrophes. Members of Montana's tribal and county health departments discuss emergency preparedness and response at the local level in the aftermath of September 11th, 2001. (First Aired Thursday, January 23, 2003)


Shortfall (No. 1109)

Lawmakers in Helena are dealing with an estimated $250 million budget shortfall. Gene Brodeur looks at where cuts will likely be made and at emerging solutions for eradicating the red ink. (First Aired Thursday, February 13, 2003)


Past Lessons (No. 1110)

Gene Brodeur talks with Anthony A. Goodman, professor of medicine and microbiology at MSU and author of the historical novel Shadow of God (Source Books, 2002), which examines relationships among Jews, Muslims and Christians, mainly in the Ottoman Empire of the sixteenth century. Goodman makes it clear that the religious and ethnic tensions we read about in today's headlines are hardly new. (First Aired Thursday, February 27, 2003)


Retail Energy: A Deregulation Update (No. 1111)

It's been a few years since the 2001 Legislature passed HB 474, the deregulation bill. Last year, voters decided to repeal the measure. Public Service Commission Chairman Bob Rowe and others close to the deregulation issue talk about customer choices in the emerging market of retail energy. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, March 27, 2003)


Indian Issues in the 2003 Legislature (No. 1112)

Seven American Indians hold seats in the 2003 Montana Legislature. Legislative efforts include HB 608 (Rep. Jonathan Windy Boy) which aims to improve state-tribal relationships, and HB 422 (Rep. Carol Juneau) which calls for Indian hiring preferences for reservation schools .Gene Brodeur visits with tribal members in Helena about the impact of their collective voice in the House and Senate. (First Aired Thursday, April 10, 2003)


Coalbed Methane In Montana: Not In My Backyard! (No. 1113)

Two legislative committees and the Board of Environmental Review are debating the future of coalbed methane gas development in Montana. Meanwhile, property owners are going head to head with developers who want to drill exploratory wells to tap the methane gas. Gene Brodeur updates the ongoing debate over coalbed methane. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, April 24, 2003)


The 2003 Session: A Reporter's Notebook (No. 1114)

Montana lawmakers came to the 2003 legislative session facing a $232 million deficit. Capitol bureau chiefs Mike Dennison, of the Great Falls Tribune, and Chuck Johnson, of Lee Newspapers, join Walt Williams, who covered the session for the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, in discussing legislation aimed at balancing the state's books and other major bills that emerged from the session. (First Aired Thursday, May 08, 2003)


Montanans and the War (No. 1115)

Some fiery letters to Montana newspaper editors articulate strong support for our troops in Iraq; others vigorously denounce the Administration's actions. Some Montanans are boycotting Brie. What's going on? Gene Brodeur talks with Montana citizens about the war in Iraq and its possible aftermaths. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/ Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, May 15, 2003)


Second Thoughts About Term Limits (No. 1116)

In 1992, by a nearly two-to-one margin, Montanans passed a constitutional initiative (CI 64) setting limits on how long statewide elected executive officers, state legislators and others can hold office. In the session that ended in April, the legislature recommended longer term limits for lawmakers, and mandated that voters agree or disagree in the November, 2004, general election. Host Gene Brodeur talks with partisans on both sides about the fight over term limits and discusses how voters are likely to see the issue. (First Aired Thursday, June 12, 2003)


Department of Health and Human Services: Doing More With Less (No. 1117)

Like many other states, Montana's funds for social services are badly depleted and there's no relief in sight. Gene Brodeur looks at the likely consequences for health care and child care in Montana. (First Aired Thursday, June 26, 2003)


Summer Reading (No. 1118)

Cindy Christin, children's librarian for the Bozeman public library, talks with host Gene Brodeur about the buzz over the new Harry Potter book and recommends additional titles for kids 6 years old and older. Then Brodeur heads to Helena to visit with Christie Briggs, of the Talking Book Library, a volunteer service for visually impaired people throughout the state. (First Aired Thursday, July 10, 2003)


West Nile Virus In Montana (No. 1119)

West Nile virus is upon us. Last year the mosquito-borne virus turned up in 26 Montana counties. Gene Brodeur brings us up to date in interviews with MSU etymologist Greg Johnson, with Tom Linfield, a state veterinarian, and with a Belgrade vet who is inoculating horses to protect them from the virus. (First Aired Thursday, July 24, 2003)

2001 & 2002


Keeping The School Doors Open (No. 1001)

Montana Superintendent of Public Instruction Linda McCulloch joins Helena School Board member Geoff Feiss and Rep. Larry Lehman for an examination of alternative funding proposals involving public education in Montana. This program was pre-empted in September. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, November 08, 2001)


Hunting Season: Hunting Risks (No. 1002)

Gene Brodeur examines hunter safety issues and the potential for rifles to misfire with nationally recognized gunsmith Jack Belk of Buhle, Idaho, and Richard Barber, whose son was fatally wounded when a rifle discharged at the family hunting camp last year. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, October 11, 2001)


The Forest Service: Administrative Gridlock? (No. 1003)

Administrative Gridlock? So says University of Maryland professor of environmental policy Robert H. Nelson in his book entitled A Burning Issue. Gene Brodeur visits with Dr. Nelson about his case for abolishing the U.S. Forest Service, and supporters who feel that the agency is doing a good job. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, October 25, 2001)


Thanksgiving Reflections (No. 1004)

Religious leaders and educators look back on the calamitous events of September 11, 2001 as the nation observes Thanksgiving Day. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, November 22, 2001)


Dui Road Fatalities (No. 1005)

National Highway Traffic Administration data shows that Montana is second only to Mississippi in the number of alcohol related traffic deaths. Gene Brodeur examines the DUI issue in Montana and the growing number of calls for tougher laws against repeat DUI offenders. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, December 13, 2001)


Building Goodwill (No. 1006)

With help from the locals, it took Greg Mortenson less than 3 months to build a school in Hushe. That was 3 years and 38 students ago. Today, the Hushe school in northern Pakistan has 91 students including 22 girls. Gene Brodeur visits with the former mountain climber about his efforts to improve education in this politically volatile part of the world. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, January 10, 2002)


Working Together (No. 1007)

It has been nine years since Billings residents took a stand against hate crimes that gained national attention. Gene Brodeur is joined by members of the community who are continuing to raise the public's awareness of civil rights issues. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, February 14, 2002)


Does Less TV = Less Violence? (No. 1008)

A recent Stanford University study revealed a 50% drop in verbal aggression and a 40% reduction in physical aggression among elementary school children who cut back the amount of time they spend watching television and playing video games. Can it be? Gene Brodeur visits with educators and other experts in the field of child behavior to find out. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, February 28, 2002)


Welfare Reform Phase II (No. 1009)

Caseloads are up; welfare reform programs are being cut. Department of Health and Human Services official Hank Hudson talks about the shift of funds for job training and housing assistance to provide direct aid to Montanans who are out of work. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Thursday, March 28, 2002)


Counseling in the Aftermath of 9/11 (No. 1010)

Gene Brodeir visits with Montana members of the National Critical Stress Management Team about their recent counseling of New York City police and firefighters at ground zero. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, April 11, 2002)


Milltown Dam: Clean Up Or Removal? (No. 1011)

The Milltown Dam, built in 1907, is now a Superfund Site, and the EPA is about to decide how to clean it up. Gene Brodeur talks with key players at the federal and local level in Missoula, about solutions under consideration for the Milltown Dam and Two Rivers Project. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, April 25, 2002)


Long Range Forecast: Dry (No. 1012)

Summer will soon be upon us and with it are indicators that an El Nino condition will hit the Northwest. While El Nino translates to rain near the equator, it means warmer temperatures and drier weather in the Rockies. Gene Brodeur is joined by Meteorologist Ken Mielke and Snow Survey specialist Roy Kaiser for an assessment of El Nino's impact on Montana's rivers, streams, and crops. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, May 09, 2002)


Deregulation: Time to Switch (No. 1013)

Starting next month, some 290,000 Northwestern Energy customers will see their monthly utility bills increase. That s when Montana joins 8 other states that have deregulated energy prices. Gene Brodeur examines the impact of the controversial shift to buying energy on the open market. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, June 13, 2002)


Saving Languages: A Matter of Cultural Survival (No. 1014)

Students at Montana s seven reservations are learning languages that came close to disappearing. Gene Brodeur visits with American Indian language scholars who attended the Ninth Annual Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium, which this year, was held at MSU, Bozeman. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, June 27, 2002)


Counter-Terrorism Efforts In Montana (No. 1015)

President Bush has calls terrorism "a grave threat to the liberty andsafety of our people, and to civilization itself." Gene Brodeur examines homeland security issues in Montana and efforts to patrol the state's common border with Canada. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, July 11, 2002)


Mouse in the House: Hantavirus (No. 1016)

Deer mice are not uncommon in rural subdivisions, barns, and other outbuildings. Some mice carry an airborne, often fatal infection called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome--in Montana, usually just called "hantavirus." Gene Brodeur talks with Montana Tech researcher Richard Douglass about his researches into hantavirus in Anaconda, Butte, and Cascade. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Thursday, July 25, 2002)

2000 & 2001


Looks:10; Pay:3 (No. 901)

Montana has a quality of life that is rarely matched. So where are the jobs and what's with the wages? In the season premiere, Gene Brodeur looks back on what has happened since the economic development summit that was held in the capitol city last June. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, Bozeman (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, September 15, 2000)


Montana's Summer of Fire (No. 902)

The catastrophic fires that raged through Montana have fueled the debate over how best to manage forest and rangeland. Gene Brodeur and his guests examine past and future approaches to suppressing wildfires. (First Aired Friday, October 13, 2000)


Revisiting The 30-Second Campaign (No. 903)

There is lots of talk about campaign finance reform in the year 2000 election, yet the negative ads keep on coming. Montana Profiles takes a look at some specific races, so called "soft money" ads, and how politicians distance themselves from the negative commercials. (First Aired Friday, October 27, 2000)


Let It Snow ... Please! (No. 905)

After three years of drought and disastrous fires, Montana is in desperate need of a traditional winter. But, will we get one? Gene Brodeur is joined by Meteorologist Ken Mielke and Snow Survey specialist Roy Kaiser for a discussion about what it will take to regenerate the state's dwindling streams and reservoirs. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, November 24, 2000)


Yugoslavia: In Transition Or Trouble? (No. 906)

Balkans expert Dr. Franke Wilmer, and documentarian Stephen Maly examine the transition of government in Yugoslavia after the fall of Slobodan Milosevic. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman; (406) 994 - 3437. (First Aired Sunday, December 17, 2000)


The New Millenium: What A Start! (No. 907)

Gene Brodeur is joined by newspaper editors for a look back at the highlights of year 2000. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman; (406) 994 - 3437. (First Aired Friday, December 29, 2000)


Reintroducing The Grizzly (No. 908)

They're not back yet, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has named a Citizen Management Committee to move ahead with a plan that would, over a 5 year span, place 25 grizzly bears in the Bitteroot ecosystem. Gene Brodeur examines this controversial grizzly recovery program. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, January 14, 2001)


My, How The Local Library Is Changing (No. 909)

As we move forward into the 21st Century, local libraries are facing some tough decisions. Will patrons be downloading best sellers? Gene Brodeur visits with Montana library directors about what the library of the future might look like. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, January 28, 2001)


Deregulation: A Breather (No. 910)

Under the 1997 deregulation bill, Montana's utility rates were scheduled to hit the competitive market next year, but the PSC granted a reprieve for residential and small businesses until July of 2004. Gene Brodeur updates this ongoing process in the wake of astronomical rate hikes in the West. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994 - 3437. (First Aired Friday, February 09, 2001)


Not In Our Town Revisited (No. 911)

It has been seven years since the city of Billings said, Not in Our Town! to a series of anti-Semitic and Native American hate crimes. Gene Brodeur examines a recent holocaust denial advertisement that was placed in the MSU-Billings student newspaper. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994 - 3437. (First Aired Friday, February 23, 2001)


Focus On Schools (No. 912)

President Bush has placed education at the top of his agenda. Governor Martz has promised to address the shortage of teachers in Montana. With all that emphasis on education, why isn't Montana more successful at offering teachers competitive salaries? Gene Brodeur examines the future of education in times of economic uncertainty. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Friday, March 02, 2001)


Building for the Future (No. 913)

With the number of farms in decline in Montana, some residents in hot growth areas are using growth projection surveys to help them create green space. Gene Brodeur looks at two such models being considered in Park County. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994 - 3437. (First Aired Sunday, March 25, 2001)


The Debate Over Montana's Death Penalty (No. 914)

A measure that would have abolished the state's death penalty went down to defeat in the house, but the debate continues. Gene Brodeur examines both sides of this emotional issue. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, April 15, 2001)


The 2001 Legislature (No. 915)

Deregulation, education, and the environment were among the major issues that state lawmakers dealt with during the 57th legislative session. Gene Brodeur looks back at the busiest three months in the capitol. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, April 29, 2001)


The 2000 Census: Some Win; Some Lose (No. 916)

The recently released population figures for Montana indicate large growth in many of the western and southwestern counties of the state. Conversely Rosebud, Deer Lodge, and three other counties showed a population loss over the past 10 years. Gene Brodeur examines the political and economic impact of the 2000 census. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, May 11, 2001)


Deregulation Or Re-Regulation? (No. 917)

No fewer than 34 measures involving electric utility issues were introduced during the 2001 legislative session. Lawmakers and utility experts consider what measures passed and if Montana is destined for some of the same power emergencies that California has been experiencing. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, May 25, 2001)


The Summer Fire Season (No. 918)

Following the disastrous fire season of 2000, 1.8 billion dollars was allocated to beef up fire fighting personnel and strategies in the west. Gene Brodeur examines where that money will be going, and what' s in store for Montana this fire season. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, June 08, 2001)


E-Books Anyone? (No. 919)

Author Frederick Wolf publishes on-line and doesn't care if someone downloads his books without paying. He is convinced that E-books are the future, despite the cries of protest from those of us who refuse to let go of our most treasured printed books. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM-TV, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman, ( 406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, June 22, 2001)


The Bush Energy Plan In Montana (No. 920)

President Bush's strategy for energy independence includes easing the permitting process for oil and gas development. What does that mean for our state? Gene Brodeur considers the impact. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, July 13, 2001)


Doing Business In Montana (No. 921)

Gene Brodeur visits with Director of Commerce Mark Simonich and Lieutenant Governor Karl Ohs about efforts to improve Montana's economic climate. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM, Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, July 27, 2001)

1999 & 2000 


Go Directly to Jail (No. 801)

In the season premiere, Gene Brodeur delves into the expansion of prisons in Montana. Proponents argue that we need more space to house the growing number of inmates. Opponents want to put that investment into reaching young offenders before they commit more serious crimes. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, September 17, 1999)


The Media Made Me Do It (No. 802)

Who's to blame for all this violence on the tube, the media for creating it, or the public for watching? Are V-Chips the key to a less violent society? Gene Brodeur is joined by Carroll College Professor Brent Northrup, MSU-Bozeman Media & Theatre Arts Department Head Paul Monaco, and Montana PTA President Nancy Zadick as they weigh-in on the subject of violence in films and television and its impact on society. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, September 24, 1999)


Casinos: Finding A Slot In Montana (No. 803)

Montana's history with gambling goes from prohibition in 1889 to proliferation. Gene Brodeur takes a look at legislative attempts to set up programs for compulsive gamblers, and hold the gaming industry more accountable through computerized "dial-up" reporting systems." Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, October 08, 1999)


There's No Excuse for Domestic Violence (No. 804)

Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women. In this community approach to dealing with this troubling issue in Montana, Gene Brodeur visits with experts about abusive relationships and when to do something about them. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, October 22, 1999)


Long Range Forecast Dry (No. 805)

On the heels of a long summer without much rain, it looks like Montana's winter will continue to be dry. Ken Mielke, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Great Falls, assesses the impact that the continuing La Nina phenomena will have in our state. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. Contact Gene Brodeur, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Sunday, November 14, 1999)


Welfare Reform: Is It Working? (No. 806)

In 1995, Montana was one of the first states in the nation to adopt a welfare to work program. Welfare rolls are down, but critics charge that the price for some is poverty. Gene Brodeur takes an updated look at Montana's welfare reform policy. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. Contact Gene Brodeur, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, November 19, 1999)


Montana Century (No. 807)

Gene Brodeur visits with historian Mike Malone, editor of Montana Century. The book chronicles, in words and pictures, the people and events that shaped contemporary Montana. Writers who contributed to the look back at the Treasure State's past 100 years will join the discussion. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. Contact Gene Brodeur, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Sunday, December 19, 1999)


Urban Planning Or Urban Sprawl? (No. 808)

Gene Brodeur revisits the ongoing debate over land use and planning in Montana. As we head into the new century, there are indications that some communities are learning from mistakes made in more populous states. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, January 14, 2000)


Corporate Campaign Donations: A First Amendment Issue (No. 809)

Montana voters passed a controversial initiative in 1996 which denies businesses from making donations to initiative campaigns. But Initiative 125 was declared unconstitutional. Gene Brodeur visits with representatives from both sides, who vow to take their battle over I-125 to the nation's highest court. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanPBS, MSU. (First Aired Friday, January 28, 2000)


The World Trade Organization: Deeply Divided (No. 810)

What was it about the WTO agenda that prompted some 50,000 protestors to take to the streets and shutdown the city? Gene Brodeur looks back at last November's tumultuous WTO meeting in Seattle. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU. (First Aired Friday, February 11, 2000)


On-Line Free Speech (No. 811)

Four years ago, Congress passed the Telecommunications Act and the Communications Decency Act of 1996. The laws triggered a debate that has grown almost as rapidly as internet commerce. Gene Brodeur examines the issue of intellectual freedom amid calls for censorship on the net. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman, (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, March 24, 2000)


Warm Enough? Solutions to Global Warming In Montan (No. 812)

In cities, factories put scrubbers on their emission stacks to reduce pollutants. Gene Brodeur visits with Mountain Research Center director Lisa Graunlich about "biological scrubbers" which might be a big plus in the effort to reduce global warming in rural areas. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/MontanaPBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Friday, April 14, 2000)


Whose Road Is This? (No. 813)

The Bureau of Land Management's final EIS report is due later this year. Gene Brodeur visits with proponents and opponents of motorized off-highway vehicles on public lands. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. Contact Montana PBS (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, May 12, 2000)


June Primary (No. 814)

Journalists join Gene Brodeur for a look back at the June 6th Montana Primary and issues that will shape debates leading up to the general election in November. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, June 11, 2000)


The Special Session (No. 815)

Governor Racicot called lawmakers back to Helena in May to deal with tax issues and economic development. Gene Brodeur visits with legislative leaders to get their take on accomplishments and challenges that lie ahead for Montana. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Sunday, June 25, 2000)


Who Has The Power? (No. 816)

Six of Montana's largest cities are interested in buying Montana Power Company's remaining gas and electric assets. What does this mean for MPC customers caught up in the deregulation process? Gene Brodeur examines this unique but untried approach. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Friday, July 14, 2000)


Child Abuse In Montana (No. 817)

Gene Brodeur examines a just-completed comprehensive survey about how Montanan's feel about child abuse and neglect, and how the state should address these issues. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana PBS, MSU-Bozeman. (First Aired Friday, July 28, 2000)

1998 & 1999


School Violence: A Wake Up Call (No. 701)

Students return to the classroom amid parental anxieties about their safety. Gene Brodeur examines the risk that Montana school districts face in the wake of school shootings in Jonesboro, Arkansas, and Springfield,Oregon. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, September 11, 1998)


Get It First, Get It Right (No. 702)

Newsrooms are under increasing pressure to break exclusive stories that will grab ratings and increase readership. At what price? Print, broadcast, and journalism school representatives join Gene Brodeur for a look at the impact that botched reports have on the credibility of the journalistic community. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, September 25, 1998)


Ci-75 Who Decides On Tax Hikes? (No. 703)

Gene Brodeur is joined by supporters and opponents of Constitutional Initiative 75. The measure, which will appear on the November ballot, would give citizens the right to vote on tax increases proposed by all levels of government in Montana. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, October 09, 1998)


Democracy Project: Montana "Ad Watch" (No. 704)

A special one hour look at :30 second TV campaign commercials and how they can be used to drive the agendas of special interest groups, rather than articulating voter concerns such as health care, education, and jobs. Gene Brodeur will be joined by print and broadcast journalists and consultants who advise politicians about their image, and defining issues in congressional and state races. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, October 16, 1998)


A Look Back: The November 3rd Election (No. 705)

Gene Brodeur is joined by leading Montana political journalists in analyzing congressional, legislative, and key ballot iniative measures that were decided in Montana's November General Election. (First Aired Friday, November 13, 1998)


From El Nino to La Nina (No. 706)

Last winter, meteorologists and farmers were busy evaluating the impact of El Nino on Montana's crops. While most of the country was snowed under and drenched with heavy rainfall, Montana remained dry. This year, just the opposite could occur. Gene Brodeur is joined by a panel of experts examining the La Nina phenomenon. (First Aired Friday, November 27, 1998)


Waco: The Rules of Engagement (No. 707)

Producer and former CNN correspondent Dan Gifford, who produced the full-length documentary about the 1993 shootout at Branch Davidian headquarters in Waco Texas, talks with Gene Brodeur about the film which was nominated for an Academy Award. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Sunday, December 20, 1998)


The Tobacco Deal: Montana's Share (No. 708)

Montana stands to receive $832 million as a result of the tobacco industry's multi-state settlement. Gene Brodeur examines the impact of the landmark agreement and how that money will be spent. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, January 15, 1999)


Foster Care Revisited (No. 709)

If anything, child welfare has slipped further into crisis over the past year. Public and private advocates of foster care outline their agendas for the '99 legislative session, and review the state of childwelfare services in Montana. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/ Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, January 29, 1999)


Deregulation: An Ongoing Process (No. 710)

A Montana Profiles local follow-up to the national public television program "Power Switch", this episode explores the transition to deregulation since the 1997 passage of Montana Senate Bill 390, The Electric Utility Industry Restructuring Act. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, February 12, 1999)


Tax Reform: Is Montana Ready for a Sales Tax? (No. 711)

Montana Governor Racicot has described the state's tax structure as a "Model-T system is a microchip world." Could the timing be right to revive a plan that was soundly defeated a few years ago? Gene Brodeurvisits with members of The Montana Tax Policy Coalition about their efforts to advance another retail sales tax proposal during the '99 session of the State Legislature. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Sunday, February 28, 1999)


Y2k: Are You Ready? (No. 712)

Utter chaos or not to worry? It depends upon whom you talk to about the Y2K problem. Gene Brodeur visits with experts who are tracking the race to make computers compliant and head off massive shutdowns when January 1, 2000 rolls around. Produced by Gene Brodeur, for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur, 406-994-3437. (First Aired Friday, March 12, 1999)


Social Security: High Stakes (No. 713)

Boomers are worried that their checks won't be in the mail when they're eligible for social security. Should the "pay as you go" system remain unchanged, or should government yield to the push to let people invest a portion of their Social Security taxes in individual accounts? Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur, 406-994-3437. (First Aired Friday, March 26, 1999)


Holocaust Denial (No. 714)

Rabbinic aide Stanley Rosenberg recalls the liberation of the Buchenwald death camp in April of 1945 and responds to efforts to discount the genocide of European Jews by the Nazis during World War II. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Televison, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, April 16, 1999)


Montana's Initiative Process: Time to Raise The Bar? (No. 715)

Gene Brodeur examines arguments to make it tougher to qualify ballot measures, in the wake of the State Supreme Court decision declaring CI-75 unconstitutional. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, April 30, 1999)


Racial Dialogue: A Work In Progress (No. 716)

Gene Brodeur continues an ongoing examination of race issues in Montana, with an update of efforts to promote education and understanding as a means of resolving differences. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur, 406-994-3437. (First Aired Sunday, May 16, 1999)


Blue Berets (No. 717)

A conversation with producer Stephen Maly about his documentary examining the role of UN peacekeeping troops in the Republic of Macedonia. Also joining the discussion about soldiering in the post Cold War era, MSU Political Science Professor Franke Wilmer. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur, 406-994-3437. (First Aired Friday, May 28, 1999)


The 56th Session (No. 718)

Reporters who covered the 1999 Montana Legislative Session look back at the highlights and direction that emerged from the last gathering of Montana lawmakers before the millenium. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur, 406-994-3437. (First Aired Friday, June 11, 1999)


Is Gay Education Our Elementary Teacher's Job? (No. 719)

Can teachers deal with gay issues in elementary education in age-appropriate ways? Gene Brodeur visits with education providers and members of the community about the issues of understanding and tolerance that were addressed in the documentary "It's Elementary". Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, June 25, 1999)


Children at Risk (No. 720)

Two parent households, education, and health insurance are among the six factors that contribute to a child's well-being. Gene Brodeur examines the 1999 Kids Count Data Book criteria for "high risk" families. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, July 09, 1999)


The Missoula Demonstration Project (No. 721)

A fifteen year study aimed at exploring quality of life at the end of life, is underway in Missoula. Gene Brodeur visits with physician Ira Byock who maintains that the "best possible care when you are dying is not being in the hospital." Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. Contact Gene Brodeur (406) 994-3437. (First Aired Friday, July 23, 1999)

1997 & 1998


Printz, Ravalli County, Montana Vs. United States (No. 601)

County Attorneys and Sheriffs join Gene Brodeur to examine the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that upheld Ravalli County Sheriff Jay Printz's challenge to part of the Brady gun law. The nation's highest court has ruled that local officials were not required to do background checks on gun buyers. At issue now in Montana is whether even voluntary checks are legal. (First Aired Friday, September 12, 1997)


What Did You Learn In School Today? (No. 602)

Gene Brodeur explores new approaches to language and math. A foreign language program for K through 5 children at Hawthorne School in Bozeman, is attracting statewide attention. And, high school girls from rural schools and Indian reservations are being encouraged to pursue careers in science and engineering. (First Aired Friday, September 26, 1997)


Road Rage (No. 603)

Road Rage. Who are these aggressive drivers and why are they behaving so badly? Gene Brodeur examines the dramatic increase in vehicular violence that prompted the AAA to offer this advice: "never underestimate the other driver's capacity for mayhem." (First Aired Friday, October 10, 1997)


Gambling: Money for Nothing Or High Stakes? (No. 604)

Whether you call it gambling or gaming, it's on a roll. Gene Brodeur explores the rapid growth industry that we spend more money on than we do on movies, theme parks, sports and cd's collectively. Is gaming a form of easy money for local and state government, or is the long time payoff bankruptcy? (First Aired Friday, October 24, 1997)


The Cutthroat Trout: A Victim of the Times? (No. 605)

Expansion and development pose a threat to the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers that Lewis and Clark explored in 1804. Gene Brodeur examines attempts to preserve these rivers and the impact that pollution has on the state fish and other fresh water species. (First Aired Friday, November 14, 1997)


Humanities In Montana (No. 606)

On this 25th anniversary of the Montana Committee for the Humanities, Gene Brodeur visits with some of the founders of the group that was established to provide local communities with cultural programs about their state. What's in the future? Websites, films, publications and more. (First Aired Friday, November 28, 1997)


The Season of Giving (No. 607)

This is the time of year when volunteer relief agencies are stressed to the limits. Many groups are finding that cutbacks at the state and federal level are putting extra pressure on volunteer groups to fill the gaps beyond the holiday season. Gene Brodeur examines the growing needs of the have nots. (First Aired Friday, December 12, 1997)


What's New In '97? (No. 608)

Editors from newspapers throughout Montana look back on editorials and responses from readers about the stories that captured the headlines in 1997. (First Aired Friday, December 26, 1997)


Roe V. Wade: 25 Years Later (No. 609)

Gene Brodeur looks back to the time when abortion was illegal in Montana, the impact that Roe v. Wade had on our state, and the fragile future of abortion in our state. (First Aired Friday, January 23, 1998)


Roe V. Wade: Another View (No. 610)

Pro Life advocates voice their opposition to abortion and defend their support of legislation such as parental notification to limit teen access to the procedure. (First Aired Friday, February 13, 1998)


El Nino and Montana (No. 611)

Gene Brodeur examines the effect on Montana of the phenomenon known as 'El Nino', with members of the Governor's Drought Committee. The same condition that triggered flooding on the west coast, has left Montana 'high and dry'. (First Aired Friday, February 27, 1998)


Native American Foster Care (No. 612)

Indian professionals and advocates for Indian children are concerned about their welfare in a climate of shrinking Federal budgets. Gene Brodeur examines the need for Native American foster care and the obstacles facing volunteers, tribal leaders, and government agencies who are dealing with this complex issue. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Television. (First Aired Friday, March 13, 1998)


Shrinking Borders (No. 613)

Yellowstone, the nation's oldest and largest national park, is facing a difficult future. Gene Brodeur updates the ongoing debate over extending the park's borders to provide a buffer zone for bison, wolves and other migrating animals which roam outside park boundaries onto privately owned land. Produced by Gene Brodeur, KUSM/Montana Public Television. (First Aired Friday, March 27, 1998)


Outrage: A Look at Abusive Behavior Against Women (No. 614)

It's a chilling statistic. Women comprise 95% of the victims of domestic violence. Gene Brodeur explores violent male behavior and the grave risks facing women in abusive relationships. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, April 10, 1998)


Old Friends (No. 615)

The good news is that we're living longer. But what happens when we reach the age that requires some looking after? Gene Brodeur looks at some innovative programs concerning rural aging, and the growing need for senior day care centers. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, April 24, 1998)


Binge Drinking: Right of Passage Or Serious Proble (No. 616)

44% of college students across the country admit to binge drinking every couple of weeks. Gene Brodeur examines the problem on Montana campuses and what's being done to encourage students to avoid heavy drinking. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, May 15, 1998)


Whole Person Teacher Education (No. 617)

Dr. Julie Mahoney explains her eight year project involving a "hands on, minds on" teaching model aimed at promoting creativity in students by using the outdoors as a classroom whenever possible. Maloney believes that her model will enable teachers to tap the vast potential of a child's capacity for learning and creativity. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, May 29, 1998)


The Purple Breast (No. 618)

Gene Brodeur examines a unique show about breast cancer that is touring Montana. Based on a true story about a playwright who loses her battle with breast cancer, the educational production is followed by a question and answer session between the audience and medical experts on cancer awareness. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, June 12, 1998)


Slowdown Dude! (No. 619)

Since Montana scrapped its numerical speed limit more than 2 years ago traffic fatalities have jumped 34.5%. Those figures are earning Montana the dubious distinction of having the highest number of highway fatalities in the nation. Gene Brodeur updates the ongoing debate over daytime speed limits as the state legislature prepares to deal with the issue in the next session. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, June 26, 1998)


Race and Multicultural Issues On Campus (No. 620)

Growth through diversity is the theme of this special Montana Profilesfollow up to President Clinton's Initiative On Race. Diversity training is just one of the goals of the newly established Multicultural Resource Center. Gene Brodeur examines this and efforts underway at the U of M and MSU aimed at dealing with discrimination. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, July 10, 1998)


Ursus Horribillus: Endangered and Dangerous (No. 621)

There was a time when park tourists could see grizzlies foraging at o pen garbage dumps. More recent encounters occur when hikers stumble upon a sow and her cubs on a trail. Gene Brodeur visits with writer Scott McMillion and bear specialists about encounters with grizzlies in a shrinking habitat. Produced by Gene Brodeur for KUSM/Montana Public Television, MSU. (First Aired Friday, July 24, 1998)

1996 & 1997


Angst In Cyberspace (No. 501)

Gene Brodeur is joined by a panel of computer experts in examing what happens in the year 2,000 when millions of older computers and records will be rolled over to the new millennium. Will they be able to cope with the changes? (First Aired Friday, July 12, 1996)


Whirling Disease: An Update (No. 502)

Last October, a panel of experts examined the threat to Montana's blue-ribbon trout streams posed by whirling disease. The discussion continues as trout fishers from around the glove descend upon Montana duringthe peak of the fly fishing season. (First Aired Friday, July 26, 1996)


The Republican National Convention (No. 503)

Gene Brodeur hosts a conversation with noted Montanans as they reflect on the issues and platform presented during the PBS/NBC coverage of the 1996 Republican Convention which took place and aired over KUSM on August 12, 13, 14, & 15, 1996. (First Aired Friday, August 16, 1996)


The Democratic National Convention (No. 504)

Gene Brodeur hosts a conversation with noted Montanans as they reflect on the issues and platform presented during the PBS/NBC coverage of the 1996 Democratic Convention which took place and aired over KUSM on August 26, 27, 28, & 29, 1996. (First Aired Friday, August 30, 1996)


A Special Interest Look at the Conventions (W.T.) (No. 505)

Host Gene Brodeur will present a panel of concerned citizens who will discuss how they viewed the Political Conventions in terms of their individual and/or action group's agendas for the Republican or Democratic Party Platforms. (First Aired Friday, September 27, 1996)


Telecommunications Explosion (No. 506)

Gene Brodeur and members of the Governor's Blue Ribbon Telecommunications Task Force examine the rapidly expanding access to the Internet and other telecommunications services in the state. Who gets to cruise the communications highway and what will it cost? will start the conversations. (First Aired Friday, October 11, 1996)


The Changing Face of Local Government (No. 507)

Members of the Local Government Center at MSU look at upwards of 30 ballot measures that ask voters whether or not they want to shake up the existing structure of county and municipal forms of government. (First Aired Friday, October 25, 1996)


After The Vote (No. 508)

(First Aired Friday, November 08, 1996)


Finish Your Vegetables (No. 509)

What better time than the holiday season to take a look at changing trends in fufilling our nutritional needs? Gene Brodeur visits with nutritionists about letting children have a say in finishing what's ontheir plates. (First Aired Friday, November 22, 1996)


Volatile Times In Russia (No. 510)

International journalist Tom Goltz and MSU Political Science professor Franke Wilmer discuss instability in Russia and changes in Eastern Bloc Nations since the fall of Communism. (First Aired Friday, December 20, 1996)


Legislative Preview (No. 511)

Gene Brodeur and guests review the mood and make up of the 55th Session of the Montana Legislature. (First Aired Friday, December 27, 1996)


Big Sky Property Taxes: Sky's The Limit (No. 512)

Property owners are bracing for soaring reappraisals. Sweet Grass County is expected to jump 75%. Gallatin County appraisals have increased by 66%. Gene Brodeur examines legislative attempts to ease the crunch. (First Aired Friday, January 10, 1997)


Tale of Two Towns (Part I) (No. 514)

Part one of a series about urban expansion in Montana. Gene Brodeur examines the agenda of Gallatin Valley Tomorrow. The group is hosting an on-going series of community meetings to determine future growth in Bozeman. (First Aired Friday, February 14, 1997)


Tale of Two Towns (Part II) (No. 515)

Part two of a series about urban expansion in Montana. Gene Brodeur examines a unique approach to dealing with urban sprawl. MSU researchers are using a computer template to track growth in Three Forks, Montana. Their study is considered to be a prototype to assist residents or small towns in planning for future growth. (First Aired Friday, February 28, 1997)


Our Preoccupation with Being Thin (No. 516)

Gene Brodeur talks with a nutritionist, counselor and nurse practitioner about the media's projection of lean and trim models as the ticket to success in our society. The "fat phobia" often leads to eating disorders, but there are smart options to avoid these extremes. (First Aired Friday, March 14, 1997)


Overhaul of the State Mental Health Care System (No. 517)

More states are shifting mental health care from a government provided service to the private sector. Gene Brodeur examines Montana's proposal to join the growing trend. (First Aired Friday, March 28, 1997)


Dumbing Down (No. 518)

Are students as disconnected from the learning process as some charge, or has the technological boom left those who still rely on print in the dust? MSU English professor Michael Sexson, and winners of a recent essay contest he conducted on the subject of intellectual standards, join Gene Brodeur for a discussion about the persuit of higher education in the nineties. (First Aired Friday, April 11, 1997)


Aids In Montana, An Update (No. 519)

Centers for Disease Control statistics for the first half of 1996 show a 12% drop in AIDS fatalities - the first significant drop since the CDC began tracking the disease 15 years ago. Gene Brodeur discusses the reasons behind the decline with members of the Montana Chapter of the American Red Cross and other AIDS workers in the state. (First Aired Friday, April 25, 1997)


Legislative Wrap Up (No. 520)

Leaders from the Senate and House join Gene Brodeur for a look back on the accomplishments and shortcomings of the just completed 55th session of the Montana State Legislature. (First Aired Sunday, May 11, 1997)


The Bison Issue (No. 521)

The state's policy to slaughter buffalo leaving the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park came under heavy fire from opponents this past winter. Caught in the crossfire are Governer Racicot, Park Superintendent Mike Finley and other policy makers who are trying to initiate a policy that might ease rancher's concerns about the threat of brucellosis spreading to their herds, and environmentalists who want to stop the practice of shooting the animals. (First Aired Sunday, May 25, 1997)


"Honey, I Shrunk The Revenues" (No. 522)

Gene Brodeur continues his follow up on the 55th session of the Montana Legislature. When lawmakers voted in a property tax freeze, local governments took a bath in red ink. Will the freeze trigger cutbacks of anticipated city services or will Senate Bill 195 allow a two year time span to work out a better solution? (First Aired Friday, June 13, 1997)


"Are We Caving In to the Feds?" (No. 523)

When the 1997 legislature rammed through a stop gap measure to guarantee more than $100 million dollars in federal welfare money, critics said that it translated to a loss in sovereignty. Lawmakers join Gene Brodeur in a discussion over this move to collect revenues from deadbeat parents who dodge the system. (First Aired Friday, June 27, 1997)


Deregulation: A Better Bang for the Buck? (No. 524)

Members of the fifty-fifth session of the Montana Legislature passed a couple of key measures that will deregulate gas and electric utilities and telecommunications. Gene Brodeur visits with lawmakers and power company representatives to find out more about the impact that changes will have on consumers. (First Aired Friday, July 11, 1997)


Don't Fence Me In (No. 525)

It's no secret that the Rockies have been discovered. As urban dwellers flee the city in hordes for their piece of the Big Sky, the landscape undergoes dramatic changes. Authors, who have been tracking the migration and its resulting changes, discuss the evolution of the new West. (First Aired Friday, July 25, 1997)

1995 & 1996


Grazing Fees (No. 401)

(First Aired Friday, July 14, 1995)


Whose Water Is This? (No. 402)

(First Aired Friday, July 28, 1995)


Welfare Reform In Montana (No. 403)

(First Aired Friday, September 08, 1995)


Medicare Reform (No. 404)

(First Aired Friday, September 22, 1995)


The New Viruses (No. 405)

(First Aired Friday, October 13, 1995)


Working Class Heroes (No. 406)

(First Aired Friday, October 27, 1995)


Home Schooling (No. 407)

(First Aired Friday, November 10, 1995)


First Amendment (No. 408)

(First Aired Friday, November 24, 1995)


Hate In Montana (No. 409)

(First Aired Friday, December 29, 1995)


Speed (No. 410)

Montana is one of 2 states with no daytime speed limit for motorists. Gene Brodeur talks with Highway Patrol officials, insurance representatives and Highway Safety officials about the impact of repealing the 21 year old federal speed limit. (First Aired Friday, January 12, 1996)


Past, Present, Future (No. 411)

Author, cartoonist Stan Lynde and author Gail Shirley reflect on their writings about Montana's historical past and the state's growth. (First Aired Friday, January 26, 1996)


Act On Violence: An Update (No. 412)

It's been more than a year since the KUSM series on youth violence and its impact on Montana. Gene Brodeur looks at some innovative school programs aimed at diffusing youthful confrontations before they reach a dangerous flashpoint. (First Aired Sunday, February 04, 1996)


The Wolves of Yellowstone (No. 413)

Ranchers think it's a bad idea. Biologists and environmentalists say it's about time that wolves are back in Yellowstone National Park. Gene Brodeur examines the ongoing debate over last year's decision to return wolves to the Yellowstone Ecosystem. (First Aired Friday, February 23, 1996)


Sustainable Communities (No. 414)

As we rapidly approach the milennium communities are facing a very different future. Gene Brodeur examines the combination of socioeconomic and technological innovations that are changing the way we live. (First Aired Friday, March 15, 1996)


What's That You Said? (No. 415)

Language is changing almost as quickly as we speak. Gene Brodeur looks at our whimsical fondness for transforming nouns into verbs, and how other countries are attempting to stem the invasion of English words into their language. (First Aired Friday, March 29, 1996)


Is The Flat Tax Fair? (No. 416)

Some say that the Forbes 17% flat tax proposal would create a windfall for the wealthy. Montana economists join Gene Brodeur for a discussion of who would benefit and who would lose under a flat-tax system. (First Aired Friday, April 12, 1996)


Bowdlerizing The Net (No. 417)

There are increasing demands for censorship on the Internet. Should this global resource be subject to limitations on what is accessible? MSU Computer Science Department Head Dr. Denbigh Starkey leads the panel discussion on censorship and the Net. (First Aired Friday, April 26, 1996)


The Freeman Movement In Montana (No. 418)

Gene Brodeur examines the ideology of the anti government group and the events that led up to the standoff between FBI agents and a group ofFreemen at the Clark Ranch in Jordan, Montana. Are members tied to the Christian Identity Doctrine as some have charged? (First Aired Friday, May 10, 1996)


Health Care Revisited (No. 419)

In September of last year, Congress began work on a sweeping overhaul of the Health Care System. It included continued coverage for employees who changed jobs and also called for insurance companies to halt teh practice of denying coverage to clients with pre-existing medical conditions. Gene Brodeur examines the current legislation to see what has survived the congressional debate. (First Aired Friday, May 24, 1996)


Post Primary (No. 420)

Gene Brodeur is joined by political reporters and political scientistsin a review of Montana's June Primary results as well as what's in store for the November 5th General Election. (First Aired Friday, June 14, 1996)


Gambling In Montana (No. 421)

The number of video gaming machines in Montana is on the rise. On one hand, gaming provides much needed revenue for shrinking government budgets. Some opponents argue that the price society pays is too high. Gene Brodeur examines the on going debate. (First Aired Friday, June 28, 1996)

1994 & 1995


Back to School (No. 301)

(First Aired Friday, September 09, 1994)


To Tax Or Not to Tax? (No. 302)

(First Aired Friday, September 23, 1994)


Fighting Fires in the West (No. 303)

(First Aired Friday, October 14, 1994)


Live Phone In with Congressional Candidates (No. 304)

(First Aired Friday, October 28, 1994)


Post Election Analysis (No. 305)

(First Aired Friday, November 11, 1994)


Governor Racicot's Health Care Authority (No. 306)

(First Aired Friday, November 25, 1994)


Holiday Special with Stuart Weber (No. 307)

(First Aired Friday, December 23, 1994)


Back to Work: Montana's 54th Legislative Session (No. 308)

(First Aired Friday, January 13, 1995)


1995 Legislative Session/The State of Our Economy (No. 309)

(First Aired Friday, January 27, 1995)


Where Shall The Buffalo Roam? (No. 310)

(First Aired Friday, February 10, 1995)


Big Ticket Items of 1995 Legilature (No. 312)

(First Aired Sunday, March 12, 1995)


Women In Politics (No. 313)

(First Aired Friday, March 24, 1995)


Legislative Session....(Higher Ed Cuts) (No. 311)

(First Aired Sunday, April 02, 1995)


Legislative Wrap (No. 314)

(First Aired Friday, April 14, 1995)


Governor Mark Raciot and the 95 Legislature (No. 315)

(First Aired Friday, April 28, 1995)


Counter Terrorism Proposals (No. 316)

(First Aired Friday, May 12, 1995)


Two Strikes and You Are Out/Crime and Punishment (No. 317)

(First Aired Friday, May 26, 1995)


Water Quality (No. 318)

(First Aired Friday, June 09, 1995)


Affirmative Action (No. 319)

(First Aired Friday, June 23, 1995)


1993 & 1994


Income Tax Measures (Natelson) (No. 201)

(First Aired Sunday, September 12, 1993)


Health Care (No. 202)

(First Aired Sunday, September 26, 1993)


Special Session Preview (No. 203)

(First Aired Monday, October 11, 1993)


Nafta Debate (No. 204)

(First Aired Sunday, October 24, 1993)


University System (No. 205)

(First Aired Sunday, November 07, 1993)


Afta Nafta (No. 206)

(First Aired Sunday, November 21, 1993)


Special Session I (Dec-93) (No. 207)

(First Aired Sunday, December 05, 1993)


Special Session (December 93) (No. 208)

(First Aired Sunday, December 12, 1993)


Special Session Wrap-Up (No. 209)

(First Aired Sunday, December 19, 1993)


An Old Fashioned Holiday (No. 210)

Host Gene Brodeur steps back in time with Reese Summers, curator of the living history exhibit at the Museum of the Rockies' Tinsley House. The home, which was built in 1889, is staffed by volunteers who recreate the pioneer spirit that is legendary in Montana. We'll see how settlers worked the land and celebrated the holiday season. (First Aired Sunday, December 26, 1993)


A Look Back-Special Session Wrap Up (No. 211)

(First Aired Sunday, January 09, 1994)


Logging (No. 212)

(First Aired Sunday, January 23, 1994)


Hate Crimes (No. 213)

(First Aired Sunday, February 06, 1994)


Hanta Virus (No. 214)

(First Aired Sunday, February 20, 1994)


Consolidation of Higher Education (No. 215)

(First Aired Sunday, March 06, 1994)


Women in the Work Force (No. 216)

(First Aired Sunday, March 20, 1994)


Confronting The Issue of Aids (No. 217)

(First Aired Sunday, April 03, 1994)


Health Care (Governors Task Force) (No. 218)

(First Aired Sunday, April 17, 1994)


Montana Cowgirls (No. 219)

(First Aired Sunday, May 01, 1994)


Theatre In Montana (No. 220)

(First Aired Sunday, May 15, 1994)


Reporter Or Cynic? (No. 221)

(First Aired Monday, May 30, 1994)


Roll Back Those Taxes (No. 222)

(First Aired Sunday, June 12, 1994)


Boom Time In Montana (No. 223)

(First Aired Sunday, June 26, 1994)


This Thing Called Hate (No. 224)

(First Aired Friday, July 08, 1994)


A Look at "Tbi", Traumatic Brain Injury (No. 225)

(First Aired Friday, July 22, 1994)

1993


The 1993 Legislative Session Pt7 (No. 111)

(First Aired Sunday, April 11, 1993)


The 1993 Legislative Session Pt8 (No. 112)

(First Aired Sunday, April 25, 1993)